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Posts Tagged ‘Metal on metal hip replacement recall’

Seniors and Athletes are Prone to Hip Fracture and Victims of the DePuy Hip Replacement recall

Written by lisaspitzer on . Posted in Depuy Hip Replacement News

Now that the dePuy Hip Replacement is going to trial we can take a look at who is most likely to be a victim of a failed DePuy. Well, it is most likely someone prone to Hip fractures whic eventually result in needing a hip replacement. DePuy Hip replacement helpline is reaching out to seniors and athletes as the time is running short. Each state has a statute of limitations and that is usually going to block your ability to file. You must act quickly.

Everyone is at risk of incurring fractures. On the other hand, people suffer increased risks with conditions like old age, osteoporosis, osteomyelitis, type two diabetes patients and other diseases that make the bone porous, brittle and highly permeable. Unfortunately, falls and hip injuries are common on frail elderly patients, making hip fracture rehabilitation a primary concern. Elderly and other people like athletes and workers who are prone or highly likely to incur hip injuries must establish an ongoing communication with a qualified medical doctor or orthopedic surgeon.

Types and Modes of Fractures that maybe  eventually requiring a hip replacement

There are several types of fractures, which doctors consider before diagnosis is set:

* Comminuted fracture – is the condition where the bones fragment into several pieces. * Oblique fracture – the bone breaks acquired a curved or sloping pattern. * Impacted fracture – otherwise known as the buckle fracture, this is the type of fracture whose ends are driven into each other. * Transverse fracture – the type of fracture forming a right angle to the bone’s axis. * Greenstick fracture – occurs when the bone is just bent and not fully broken. * Other types of fracture include pathologic, compressed, avulsion, depressed, and spiral.

Modes of Hip Fractures

Only a few types of fractures are associated with hip injuries, which cause back pain. With that, several modes of hip fractures and considered to thoroughly evaluate the extent of injury:

* Intertrochanteric hip fracture is the type of fracture that doesn’t involve or cause damage to the blood flow in the bone. It usually doesn’t require   hip replacement for treatment. * Intracapsular hip fracture is the type of bone breakage that occurs within the capsule of the joint. * Extracapsular hip fracture is the type of fracture that occurs at the articular extremity of the bone, which is outside the line of the attachment of the capsular ligament of the hip joint

Causes of Fractures

Bone fracture can happen to anyone. It’s typically caused by various types of trauma on the bone. Bone trauma may result from accidental falls, motor vehicle accidents or a disease that weakens the bone. Hence, hip and back injury, bone fracture may cause back pain, swelling, bruising and internal bleeding.

Assessment of Fracture Risks and Fracture Damage

The risks of getting fractures can be assessed by performing tests and evaluations on bone density, current medications taken, medical conditions, medical history or personal history, and lifestyle or work factors.

To assess actual fractures, doctors usually perform hematology tests and x-rays to evaluate and locate the fracture area. X-ray results will guide them in locating the breaks on the bones while hematology tests help them spot the decreases in HCT and Hgb, which indicative the severity of damage incurred. Doctors may assess the condition by evaluating the pain experienced from motion and the tenderness, immobility, deformity, crepitus, ecchymosis, edema and paresthesia or creeping, tingling and pricking sensations observed and experienced on the affected site

If you are an athlete who has had a Depuy hip replacement and has undergone revision surgery call the dePuy Hip Replacement Helpline today. If you are a senior or child of a senior who has had hip replacement surgery and it has been with one on the metal on metal recalls contact us immediately.

Metal on Metal Hip Replacement Toxicity, Hip Recall Lawyers Accepting Clients

Written by lisaspitzer on . Posted in Depuy Hip Replacement News

Fears of faulty 'toxic' hip replacement implant

Mon, 30 Jan 2012 12:33:00 EST

Today many newspapers and TV stations have reported that medical regulators have launched an investigation into a type of hip replacement called a “metal-on-metal” (MoM) device (DePuy ASR hip replacement implant). The concern is that as the hip replacements wear down, metal particles can be released from the artificial hip, react with the soft tissue (such as muscle and ligaments) surrounding the joint and enter the bloodstream. In 2010, the UK regulator, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) issued a product recall for DePuy ASR, a brand of MoM artificial hip. This meant that surgeons were told not to implant DePuy ASR hip replacements and return any unused implants to the manufacturer.

The MHRA has urged surgeons to tell all patients that had received these DePuy ASR hip replacements about the recall, and to schedule them for annual follow-up visits. If the person who had a DePuy ASR hip replacement implant experiences pain, the surgeons should consider measuring the level of metals in their blood measured and should examine the soft tissue to see if reactions have occurred. If necessary, removal and replacement of the implant should be considered.

The Sunday Telegraph has brought this story to the public attention again because of what it says are subsequent developments. The Telegraph claims that the risk from the devices is greater than previously thought, with greater failure rates. The Telegraph says that the MHRA is drawing up a new alert for anyone with any type of metal-on-metal hip replacement. Channel 4 News reported that around 30,000 people in Britain have received MoM hip replacements, and that the MHRA has said that, on the evidence currently available, “the majority of people with metal on metal hip replacements are at low risk of developing any serious problems”. A spokesman for the MHRA is quoted as saying: “We are continuing to closely monitor all evidence. This needs more analysis before any conclusions can be drawn and further advice given”.

Medical devices, like medicines are regulated but are coming under more scrutiny, from both the regulators and the media following widespread concerns over the emergence of faults with illegally made PIP breast implants. Find out the latest NHS information on PIP breast implants.

What types of hip replacements are there?

In the UK, approximately 70,000 hip replacements are performed each year. In a total hip replacement operation an artificial ball is attached to the top of the leg bone and an artificial socket is attached to the hip bone. The socket can be made out of plastic or ceramic, while the ball is metal. The ball is attached to a shaft, which is placed in the hollow of the leg bone (femur). Some people do not need a total hip replacement, but have a hip resurfacing operation. This has the advantage of removing less of the person’s own bone. The joint surfaces are replaced with metal inserts that cover the surfaces of the hip but do not extend down the inside or hollow of the leg bone. The metal mixtures used in hip replacements contain the metals chromium and cobalt.

What are the risks of problems following a metal-on-metal hip replacement?

When hip resurfacing was initially introduced, metal-on-metal (MoM) replacements were popular, especially with younger, active patients. An article by two orthopaedic surgeons working in Britain and published in the British Medical Journal in 2011 said that they were used in 10% of hip operations between 2006 and 2009, and 50% of all hip replacements in people younger than 50 years. However, problems with the metal resurfacing included raised chromium and cobalt in the blood, loosening of the joint, hip fracture and soft tissue reactions around the hip. It reported that problems with metal on metal hip replacements could include reactions to metal debris and associated pain, swelling, loss of movement and limping.

In March 2011, delegates at the British Hip Society annual conference discussed MoM hip replacements. Units in Belfast, Southampton, Cardiff and Stockton-on-Tees that had researched the outcomes for people who had these devices fitted over the short- to mid-term, said that a high proportion of MoM devices from other manufacturers may also be showing similar results to the withdrawn DePuy device. They found that, overall, the MoM devices showed a higher than anticipated early failure rate (most hip replacements last about 20-30 years). They found that 49% of people who had been fitted with the DePuy device needed it to be replaced by six years and between 12 and 15% who had other metal-on-metal hip replacements needed these to be replaced by five years. They said that the patients whose replacements failed tended to come to the doctors when they experienced pain. X-rays showed some patients had loosening of the joint, and some patients had raised levels of cobalt and chromium in their blood.

The inclusion of the word “poisoned” in some newspapers is likely to be wrong. Metal from the hip replacements can enter the bloodstream, but the levels of cobalt and chromium found give an indication of the wear to the hip replacement. No evidence for damage other than local tissue damage was presented. The MHRA’s advice is to monitor the level of chromium and cobalt to see if a patient requires further follow-up.

What is the advice for people who have had a MoM hip replacement?

The MHRA has not issued new guidance as yet. However, the report from the British Hip Society annual conference says that they believe that the existing advice from the MHRA still applies. This means that people who have been treated with a MoM hip replacement should be followed up regularly for five years and probably for the life of the implant. People with the withdrawn MoM hip replacements who experience pain should have this thoroughly investigated. Following the withdrawal of the DePuy device, and the MHRA guidance, the British Hip Society and the British Orthopaedic Association said:

    Everyone with a hip replacement that has been withdrawn should be informed and told that they will be under close clinical follow-up.
    Some form of follow-up should be carried out at least annually and patients should be given contact information so that they can be reviewed quickly if they have pain or lose function in their hip.
    Patients should be followed for the life of the implant until more data are available.
    If someone with a withdrawn MoM hip replacement experiences no pain or loss of function, no further investigations are required apart from standard follow-up.
    If a person with a withdrawn MoM hip replacement reports that they are in pain, the cause of the pain should be further investigated. Blood cobalt and chromium levels should be measured to indicate how much the device has worn, but there is no evidence that the implant must be replaced above a certain metal concentration.
    Treatment decisions should be confirmed with a second experienced “revision” surgeon.

People who have had a hip replacement, who are concerned, should contact their orthopaedic surgeon or GP. They should be given records of the type of hip replacement they had and receive the follow-up, if any, that is required.

If You have been diagnosed with chromium or cobalt metal toxicity from a metal on metal hip replacement call the DePuy Hip replacement Helpline and speak to amedical social worker today.